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Chongji Buddhist Order

Address: 776-2 Kangnam-gu Yeoksam-dong   Seoul Seoul 135-928
Tradition: Mahayana
Phone: 82-2-508-8933
Fax: 82-2-555-1082
E-mail: kacademy@hotmail.com
Website: http://www.chongji.or.kr
Find on:
Main Contact: Bojeong  
Spiritual Director: Hyogang  
Notes and Events:

Buddhist Chongji Order, one of the leading lay Buddhist order of South Korea, was established in 1972 as a separate organization. The foundation of Chongji Order is a historical fact in the history of Korean Buddhism which prolonged over 1,500 years. During the long journey of Korean Buddhism only few traditional order systems have been surviving where lay Buddhist’s role is less remarkably and very limited.

When Chongji Order was founded Korean Buddhism was decreasing accumulated legacy. Korean Buddhism was losing its legacy and religious zeal for its outdated order system which became irrelevant during the course of history. However, the whole social order was being modernized, and urbanized with rapid speed that was geared by Western values. In that feudalistic environment Korean monks were bound to survive and carry their inherited values. Their everyday life style and entire monastic culture was entirely different from the lay people of Korean society. Furthermore, Buddhist community had become paralyzed and even not able to understand everyday anguish and sufferings of the common mass. These circumstances provided a space for the Korean lay Buddhist order to set out the organization to proselytize the people. Moreover, the system which was near to collapsed that so called traditional Korean Buddhist orders was against of any activity organized by lay Buddhists. Chongji Order was founded in order to overcome such hindrance and motivate the common mass and find better way to proselytize the people into Buddhism.

With the mottos of “Buddhism in Everyday Life” Chongji Order thrust oneself into Korean society, and served an excellent opportunity for common people. The order built its central building not on the mountains but in the main city of South Korea, and devoted her work to modernize Buddhist rituals reflecting modern culture. The practice and teaching were also able to be led by lay Buddhist leaders. With all these changes, the order made great achievements since its foundation. Presently, the order has become one of the five major Buddhist orders of Korea, having thirty six centers with thousand of followers. Chongji Order have also established a foundation for education and welfare, and running a middle school and welfare centers. Chongji Order is also focusing on the other areas. This order has been co-founder of the Buddhist Broadcasting System and Buddhist Television Network of Korea.

Presently one of the most important activities proposing by the Chongji Order is to devote herself to build friendly relation with overseas Buddhist groups. Since 1997, Chongji Order has been promoting companionship with Chinese and Japanese Buddhist Orders for shake of popularizing the activity of order. The proposed forum to be held in coming October will be a historical momentum in this regard.

Chongji Order is committed to build the World Buddhist Exchange Center at the center of Seoul, where the center will facilitate several facilities such as bedrooms, seminar rooms, conference hall, restaurant, and meditation hall etc. for the Buddhist follower visiting Korea and around countries to get Buddhist experience.


Hwadu Meditation (Songkwang-sa)

Address: 12 Shin pyong-ri Song Kwang-myun Sunchon-si Chonnam/540-930 Korea 
Tradition: Mahayana
Phone: 82-0661-755-0107-9
Fax: 82-0661-755-0408
E-mail: songkwang@www.buddhism.or.kr
Website: http://temple.buddhism.or.kr/songkwang
Find on:
Notes and Events:

Songkwang-sa, the Sangha-jewel temple in Korea, is situated in the southwest corner of the country in the province of Cholla Namdo, between the towns of Kwangju and Sunchon. The temple was also restored in 1969 to the status of a ch\'ongnim (lit. "grove of trees"), a designation reserved for major ecumenical monasteries where training is offered in all the different varieties of Korean Buddhist practice, from Son (Zen), meditation, to doctrinal study, to recitation of the Buddha\'s name. Kusan (1910-1983) appointed it\'s Son master (pangjang), large-scale reconstruction commenced. A new meditation hall and a massive lecture hall were built. And most of the minor shrines in the monastery were repaired. Kuan\'s strong leadership and his concern to receive the Son tradition of the temple\'s founder, Chinul, restored Songkwang-sa\'s place at the forefront of the Korean Buddhist tradition. In 1973, Master Kusna also set up the Bulil International Buddhist Center. Many foreign monks come from all over the world to practice Son meditation.


Jetavana Meditation Center

Address: Seocho-Gu, Bangbae-Dong 882-33 Saeil Building, 3Fl Seoul Korea  137-060
Tradition: Theravada
Phone: (+82) 02-595-5115
Fax: (+82) 02-595-7474
E-mail: jetavanacenter@gmail.com
Website: http://seouldharmagroup.ning.com/group/jetavanameditationcenter, http://cafe.daum.net/jetavana
Find on:
Notes and Events:

Jetavana Meditation Center started in February 2009 to practice Theravada teachings in the tradition of Pa Auk Sayadaw.

The center is open every day with meditation all day.  There is formal sitting on Saturdays with instruction/interviews, and English dhamma group on Sundays.


Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism

Address: 45 Kyunji-dong Chongno-ku Seoul Korea 110-170  Seoul Seoul 110-170
Tradition: Mahayana, Jogye Order
Phone: 82-2-2011-1833
Fax: 82-2-735-0614
E-mail: hong@buddhism.or.kr
Website: http://www.koreanbuddhism.net
Find on:
President: The Most Venerable Ji Kwan  
Spiritual Director: Most Ven. Beop Jeon  
Notes and Events:

Chogye order is the biggest order of Korean Buddhism lasting more than 1,600 years in Korea. I hope many Dharma Friends all over the world will visit our home page on the Internet to find the hidden jewels of Buddhism in the Far-East region.

Hong, Min-suk

Section Chief of International Mission

Team of International Affairs
Dept. of Social Affairs
Korean Buddhist Chogye Order


Lotus Lantern International Buddhist Centre

Address: 148-5, Sokyok-dong, Chongno-ku   Seoul 110-200
Tradition: Mahayana
Affiliation: Templestay Program in Korea
Phone: (82-2) 725-5347
Fax: (82-2) 720-7849
E-mail: buddha@uriel.net
Website: http://www.buddhapia.com/mem/lotus/index.html
Find on:
Notes and Events:

Regular Program:

• Buddhism in English: Saturday 5:30 - 7:00 p.m.
For those who speak only a little English, this weekly class covers basic Buddhist ideas

• Meditation: On going Thursdays 7 - 8:30 p.m.
For beginners and advanced. Practice what you learn.

• Sutra Class: Friday 7 - 8:30 p.m.
Anyone who wants to delve into Buddhism by taking a look at the original texts, and who speak English should join this class.

• Kwna Un 108 Group (bowing and chanting) - On going Sundays 6:00 p.m.
For anyone wanting to practice or to learn more about the devotional side of Buddhism

• Childrens\'s Fun Activities with Buddha: Sunday 2:00 p.m.
Come and spend some time doing Buddhist style activities and learn something about the Buddha\'s teachings.


Nagarjuna Gumba in Seoul Korea

Address: 483-020 Jung Ang Plaza No.823 721-3  Dongducheon Seoul 483-020
Tradition: Vajrayana
Phone: 82-31-863-2204
Fax: 82-31-862-4226
E-mail: urgen_lama@hotmail.com
Website: http://www.ybakorea.org
Find on:
Spiritual Director: Urgen Lama  (Phone: 82-31-863-2204)
Notes and Events:

The Tibetan Dharma Center in Korea. Providing Dharma teachings, praying and helping for Migrant workers from Nepal.


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